Loading guidelines

WARNING
Always fasten items being carried as securely as possible. Use cargo tie-down rings and fastening materials appropriate for the weight and size of the load.

In an accident, during hard braking or sudden maneuvers, loose items will be thrown around inside the vehicle. This can cause injury to vehicle occupants unless the items are securely fastened in the vehicle.

To help avoid personal injury during a collision or sudden maneuver, exercise care when transporting cargo. Do not pile luggage or cargo higher than the seat backrests.

The trunk is the preferred place to carry objects.

Never drive a vehicle with the trunk open.

Deadly carbon monoxide (CO) gases may enter vehicle interior resulting in unconsciousness and death.

The handling characteristics of a laden vehicle are dependent on the distribution of the load within the vehicle. For this reason, you should observe the following notes when transporting a load:

 - when transporting a load, never exceed the maximum permissible gross vehicle weight or the gross axle weight rating of the vehicle (including occupants). The values are specified on the vehicle identification plate on the B-pillar of the driver's door.
 - position heavy loads as far forwards as possible and as low down in the trunk/ cargo compartment as possible.
 - the load must not protrude above the upper edge of the seat backrests.
 - always place the load against the rear or front seat backrests. Make sure that the seat backrests are securely locked into place.
 - always place the load behind unoccupied seats if possible.
 - secure the load with sufficiently strong and wear-resistant tie down. pad sharp edges for protection.

    See also:

    Notes on regularly inspecting wheels and tires
    WARNING Regularly check the tires for damage. Damaged tires can cause tire inflation pressure loss. As a result, you could lose control of your vehicle. Worn, old tires can cause accidents. If ...

    Example: step 1 to 3
    The following table shows examples on how to calculate total and cargo load capacities with varying seating configurations and number and size of occupants. The following examples use a load l ...

    DOT, Tire Identification Number (TIN)
    U.S. tire regulations prescribe that every manufacturer of new tires or retreader has to imprint a TIN in or on the sidewall of each tire produced. The TIN is a unique identification number. ...